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Living in the North End

Winding, cobblestoned alleys. Charming street signs and delicious smells of Italian cooking. No, you’re not in Europe. You’re in Boston’s North End.

Though only .36 square miles, this tiny neighborhood is a mecca of food and charm, bringing thousands of people to it daily. Settled in the 1630s, it is Boston’s oldest residential community and has welcomed people from all walks of life. During the 18th century, the North End was a hot spot for wealthy families, artisans and laborers. Intense development in the 19th century attracted waves of immigrants from Ireland, with Eastern European Jews and Italians following soon thereafter. By 1930, 99.9% of the population was Italian.

While this is no longer true, the number of Italian restaurants, markets and feasts still there make you feel like you are in “Little Italy.” In the mood for bocce? Take a walk along the waterfront and stop by Langone Park to play in one of the three courts. Sip strong espresso from local cafes, or cool down with colorful gelatos on a summer day.

If historical sites are more your scene, the North End has 12 spots on the National Register of Historic Places. One of them is Old North Church, where Paul Revere saw from its steeple that the British were coming by sea. Want more? Hop on the Freedom Trail and follow the red path to other historical sites. If you’re looking for a night on the town, catch a game or concert at nearby TD Bank Garden. Or laugh it up at the Improv Asylum.

The North End is perfect for working professionals looking for short commutes.The Financial District, Massachusetts General Hospital, TripAdvisor, Converse and other major companies are within walking distance. Suffolk University and Emerson College are also a short subway trip away.

With Boston Harbor as a backyard and Boston’s skyline a front view, the North End perfectly connects old and new with charm and elegance.

 

Public Transportation

The North End is accessible via the MBTA’s OrangeGreen and Blue Lines. The MBTA bus #4 runs along Commercial Street. It is also accessible by ferry at Rowes Wharf.

 

Who Lives There

Working professionals looking for a quick commute and folks who have lived there their entire lives.

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